Facts, Myths & Truths

Myth:

Most victims of sexual assault can prevent the assault from taking place by resisting.

Truth:

Assailants commonly overpower victims through bullying, psychological pressure and physical abuse. Moreover, some victims may be unconscious, inebriated or in a state of shock making any attempt to stop an attack impossible.

Myth:

Victims can easily “get over” the effects of sexual assault or child sexual abuse.

Truth:

The effects of sexual assault are far reaching and can severely impact an individual’s emotional stability, employment, and ability to form and maintain adult relationships.

Myth:

Most sexual assaults are not planned in advance.

Truth:

As many as 3/4 of all sexual assaults involve some pre-planning by the assailant.

Myth:

The victim must show physical injuries for it to legally be considered a sexual assault.

Truth:

The presence or absence of physical injuries is irrelevant to the determination of whether an act is "legally" considered a sexual assault; however, physical injuries may be grounds for a heightened punishment or a finding of aggravated sexual assault.

Source: www.sexassault.ca - Myths and Facts of Sexual Assault, Canada